What Is Analytical Psychology?

 What Is Analytical Psychology

  

Exactly one hundred years ago, Jung coined the term “analytical psychology” to distinguish his theory of the nature and dynamics of the human mind from the psychoanalytic theories of his compatriots Freud and Freud .

In addition to treating human behavior as derived from unconscious and conscious beliefs, analytical psychology methods also assume that the human species has collective unconsciousness and archetypes that influence our development as individuals and species.

However, the main contribution to analytical psychology is still Freud’s psychoanalysis, from which Jung drew many concepts, especially the method of exploring the unconscious through free association. 

At first, it was a theory of psychological complexes until Jung broke with Freud and transformed it into a general method of studying prototypes and unconsciousness, as well as specialized psychotherapy.

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He broke with Freud in 1912, when Jung published his groundbreaking psychology of the unconscious, which assumed two dimensions of the unconscious: personal (the repressed or forgotten content of a person’s spiritual and material life) And what he called the collective unconscious (actions and mental plans shared by these cultural members or all). 

The important concepts in the Jungian system are individualization, symbols, individual unconsciousness, collective unconsciousness, archetype, complex, individuality, shadow, anima, animus, and self. 

Most of Jung’s assumptions about his analytical psychology reflect his theoretical differences with Freud. 

Jung believes that the root of most symptoms or disorders lies in unconsciousness, so trying to understand “what the unconscious must say” through dreams, associations and fantasy is an important aspect of this type of psychotherapy.

    

It can be said that the current “three schools” of post-Jungian analytical psychology, classical, archetypal and evolutionary, correspond to developing but overlapping aspects of Jung’s research throughout his life, even though he clearly did not want to found the Jungiani school. “. 

    

In 1913, when Jung left the psychoanalytic movement, he used the term analytic psychology to refer to what he called the new psychological science, which he believed was derived from psychoanalysis.

 In simple terms, the analytical psychology approach to mental health considers the beliefs and behavior of a person as deriving from both conscious and unconscious beliefs. 

Some of the creators of mythopoetic / archetypal psychology either imagine that the “I” is not the main archetype of the collective unconscious, as Jung thought, but rather attach the same value to each archetype.

    

Analytical psychology has inspired a number of modern academic researchers to return to consideration of some of Jung’s problems related to the role of women in society, philosophy, and literary and artistic criticism. Jung has not only been a cultural symbol for generations of psychology students, but he has also put forward ideas that are important for the development of modern theory of personality. Jung identified two deep levels of psychological functioning that tend to shape, color, and sometimes threaten a person’s life experience.

    

Jung does not advocate harsh skills; he believes that everyone’s psychological development process is unique. 

Together with Freud, Jung recognized the importance of early life experiences and personal complexes, which are all in the personal unconscious due to interference in people’s lives.

 This is important to Jung because he did not regard psychology and imagery as a correlation or reflection of biological driving forces. 

Later, when he gained a foothold in himself, he mentioned Freud’s method of psychoanalysis and Adler’s individual psychology, and said that he prefers to call his method Analytical Psychology. He was referring to One covers both, as well as other general concepts. effort.

    

He is an active member of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society (formerly known as the Society of Environmental Psychology). However, Jung’s work also contributed to traditional psychology in at least one important aspect. Jung also wrote quite a lot in the field of religious psychology. For Jung, the result was that the psychological development of both sexes was disrupted.

    

Jung also believed that the personal unconsciousness is closer to the surface than Freud hypothesized, and that Jungian therapy is less connected with repressive childhood experiences.

 However, by far the most important difference between Jung and Freud is Jung’s concept of the collective (or super-individual) unconscious. Like Freud, Jung (1921, 1933) also emphasized the importance of the unconscious to the individual.

 Analytical psychology also focuses on the psychological contributions of race and culture, and the importance of maintaining a healthy balance between conflicting dynamics within the personality.

    

Jung (1947) believes that symbols from different cultures are often very similar because they arose from archetypes common to all of humanity that are part of our collective unconscious. Because these mental health professionals will be able to help them understand how unconsciousness and consciousness affect behavior. To summarize, this branch of psychology studies the relationship between consciousness and the unconscious and the mind (thought processes).

    

With a degree in Analytical Psychology, one may seek employment as a market research analyst who studies market trends in order to assess potential sales of products and / or services. Helping clients “get in touch” with their unconscious by deciphering hidden messages in the collective and personal unconscious. 

Analytical psychologists also help those recovering from chronic illness and disability, embarrassment, fear, anxiety, psychological distress, stress, anger / rage, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, and mental illness. About the psychology of the unconscious; The relationship between the ego and the unconscious).

    

It includes the rudimentary essay stages that Jung later developed in the two parts that make up this book (that is, its immense appeal demonstrates its usefulness in elucidating the nature of our human behavior and interactions, as well as in establishing important connections between disparate disciplines. For more information about CG Jung and Jungian analysis visit our bookstore and library located in CG Jungian Students may also need to take various psychological tests and self-inquiry.

    

Jung himself, in the conclusion of the first essay and precisely in the last two paragraphs of the second, explains why, in his opinion, he cannot but be so vague and at times difficult to understand. But it’s good advice (which he gives himself in the book) to try to get through what he’s trying to achieve. Then, after reading this book, move on to Richard Wilhelm’s The Secret of the Golden Flower, of course with Jung’s commentary.

 What Are The Stages Of Analytical Psychology

    

Although Jung agreed with the important role of Freud’s unconscious in personality and behavior, he expanded Freud’s view of the individual unconscious to include what Jung called the collective unconscious. 

Collective unconsciousness is a unique component, because Jung believes that this part of psychology is a form of psychological inheritance. The collective unconscious is a universal version of the individual unconscious, which contains the same mental patterns or memory traces as other members of human beings (Jung, 1928).

    

In Jungian psychology, archetypes represent universal patterns and images as part of the collective unconscious. Jung believed that the way we inherit these prototypes is the same as the way we inherit instinctive behavior.

    

Jung believes that the development of personality has gone through a series of stages, and finally reached individualization or self-realization. The last stage, transformation, was described by Jung as similar to self-realization.

    

Although this maturation process is not the only possible sequence, it is essentially what Jung called individualization. This takes time and effort, and some sacrifices are usually made in the process, but it may happen. This method includes four stages: confession, clarification, education and transformation.

    

The goal of Jungian therapy is to facilitate identification, to become the unique person that one wants to be. Psychological symptoms are seen as a sign that something got stuck or went wrong in the process. According to Jung, when the analyst understands both the patient’s symptoms and the complexes, the analyst finds the clue to the cure (Douglas, 1995).

    

Like Freud, Jung felt that analytical psychology could serve a greater purpose than just helping individuals, so he turned his attention to society in many of his books. Jung has not only been a cultural symbol for generations of psychology students, but he has also put forward ideas that are important for the development of modern theory of personality. Carl Jung is recognized as one of the most influential psychiatrists of all time.

    

He founded analytical psychology and was one of the first experts in his field to investigate the religious nature of human psychology. The use of archetypes in psychology was promoted by Jung in an essay entitled Instinct and the Unconscious in 1919. Initially, it was a theory of psychological complexes, until Jung, breaking with Sigmund Freud, turned it into a generalized method for the study of archetypes. and the unconscious, as well as in specialized psychotherapy.

    

Analytical psychology is a method of psychotherapy, pioneered by Carl Gustav Jung and expanded by many post-Jungian theorists and practitioners in the following years. It is characterized by emphasizing the role of symbolic experience in a person’s life and a forward-looking approach to the problems that arise in the treatment. It is said that he also provided “a human mental map including conscious and unconscious elements, including unconscious super-personal (prototype and spiritual) and personal levels” (Douglas, 1995, pp. 95-108).

    

The overall goal of analytical psychology or psychotherapy is seen as the realization of the wholeness of the personality through “individuation”, the process of “becoming and existing one’s own unique self” (Sedgwick, 2001, p.10). Much of Jungian psychology, also called analytical psychology or depth psychology, is centered around what Jung later called the individuation process. The individuation process was Jung’s way of explaining the path to optimal human development. Individuation is Jung’s term for the process of achieving such a command of all four functions that, even if tied to the cross of this limiting earth, one could open the eyes to the center to see, think, feel and intuitively sense the transcendence and act from there. this is knowledge.

    

In addition to the level of psychology and personality dynamics, Jung also recognized the various types of psychology produced by the combination of two basic attitudes (introverted and extroverted) and four independent functions (thinking, feeling, perception, and intuition). Jung identified two deep-level psychological functions, which tend to shape, color, and sometimes even threaten a person’s life experience. Together with Freud, Jung recognized the importance of early life experiences and personal complexes, which are in the personal unconscious due to interference in people’s lives.

    

Jung also believed that the personal unconscious was much closer to the surface than Freud assumed, and that Jungian therapy was less associated with repressed childhood experiences. Rather, Jung believed that psychology could find its basis in alchemy and that it was the collective unconscious that emerged as a result of ongoing human efforts to understand the nature of matter (Jaffe, 1979; Jung, 1961; Wehr, 1989). However, Jung touched on some very important and interesting topics in psychology.

    

Most of Jung’s hypotheses about his analytical psychology reflect his theoretical disagreements with Freud. However, the main contribution to analytical psychology remains that of Freudian psychoanalysis, from which Jung drew a number of concepts, in particular, the method of exploring the unconscious through free association. While these arguments are interesting, unfortunately, these arguments are often mistakenly viewed as reflecting analytical psychology as a whole, while the practical advantages of its approach are ignored (Sedgwick, 2001, p. 2).

    

For example, he called his new field of psychoanalysis the study of psychopaths and psychopaths. Karl Jung was one of Freud’s earliest supporters because they shared a common interest in the unconscious. He is an active member of the Vienna Psychoanalytic Society (formerly the Society of Environmental Psychology).

    

He was not opposed to lay analysts (those with a doctorate, not a M.D.); in fact, he viewed general professional experience as an important aspect of being a good analyst.

    

Although Jung encouraged patients to be independent, he recognized the importance of empathy, especially in the first three stages of treatment. He once again became one of the first psychological thinkers to see the positive aspects of aging while acknowledging the existence of weakness, loss and dissatisfaction. In his 1931 article entitled “Stages of Life” (from “The Structure and Dynamics of the Mind”, Volume 8, Collected Works of Carl Jung), Jung used the metaphor of the sun crossing the horizon To describe life. cover.

    

In Civilization in Transition (Jung, 1964), volume ten of the collected works, Jung addresses the problems of American psychology and what all Westerners can learn from the ancient Indian wisdom of studying our unconscious psyche. This suggests that modern psychological approaches to “self-knowledge” are superficial at best and do not address the true mental processes that lead to individuality.

    

However, unlike Jung’s personal preferences, psychology has largely moved away from spiritual quest, favoring a scientific assessment of the human mind. However, unlike Jung’s personal preferences, psychology largely alienates the spiritual quest, favoring a scientific assessment of the human mind. However, Jung’s work also contributed to traditional psychology in at least one important aspect.

    

The current “three schools” of post-Jungian analytical psychology, classical, archetypal and evolutionary, can be said to correspond to developing but overlapping aspects of Jung’s research throughout his life, even though he clearly did not want to found a “Jungian” school. (p. Jung (1931 / 1954b) identified four main approaches to therapy, representing four stages of development in the history of psychotherapy. Jung also proposed four stages of transference analysis (Douglas, 1995, p. 112), which is seen as “ the essence or otherwise the essence of the experience “during psychotherapy (1958, cited in Sedgwick, 2001, p. 13).

    

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